The fairest of them all?

Scenario two: you are in perfect health and in a loving relationship. You are not rich but your material needs are met. You live in a society that allows you to be yourself and in which the people around you generally behave kindly. However, the rules depend on who you are. One part of society operates under restrictions while another enjoys advantages. If I don’t tell you which group you are in, can you tell me if it is likely that you are happy there?

fairness3You can. According to statistics, you are probably not all that happy. On the whole, all people prefer to live in a society which is fair, or at least in one that they think is fair. Yes, the difference between the perceptions of the privileged and the reality of the situation is another whole problem, and another blog post. So is having the courage to try to change an unfair system. But in spite of the fact that most people in both groups will tolerate inequities, at least up to a point, the fact is that most folks would rather not have them. Interesting, huh?

Where do I get this idea? Well, several times now I’ve posted about a report on which countries have the happiest people. I spent some time reading the report once I became intrigued to learn that six attributes account for most of the variation in world happiness. I summed up the six categories as health, wealth, freedom, love, kindness and fairness. I’ve already written about the first five and today I’m thinking about fairness.

fairness2How did the happiness survey measure a population’s sense of fairness? Good question. For each of the attributes they sought out simple yardsticks that could be used to quiz participants without employing loaded words or using terms referring to happiness. To assess the quality that I refer to as fairness, they asked participants about how corrupt they thought their society was. I make the assumption that corruption results in a lack a fairness, and perhaps that other forms of injustice arise more easily in a society with lax standards. While these correlations are probably true, the question downplays deeply rooted imbalances with a long history (such as racism in the Unites States) or those that are largely universal (such as sexism everywhere).

fair1Now you might think that people would prefer to live a society in which they somehow had an advantage, and I’m sure some do. However, I believe that this survey supports the fact that most people understand at their core that if anyone can be denied rights, then their own rights are never totally safe either. I believe that most people understand in their hearts that an inequitable system puts the privileged in the unpleasant position of remaining always vigilant and ready to fight to keep their privileges. I believe that this says that many don’t like the idea that they got what is theirs through a system that cheats, and many more don’t like the idea that another is suffering so they can have more.

It is true that over the eons people have found ways to justify imbalances that work to their own advantage. Sadly, the most common one is religion. God always seems to favor the class of people making the rules. Sometimes biology is used for justification, other times a sense of obligation to care for the less fortunate. Now matter how it is couched, the downtrodden groups continue to produce scientists, athletes, leaders and heroes of all sorts that defy the justifications for discrimination. And good people from all situations cheer them on.

Today, I’m rereading this survey and indulging in a little happy dance of my own. You see, everyone knows life isn’t fair. But it seems that most of the world joins me in wishing that is was.

(For more posts on the subject of what makes us happy see If you want to be happy move to a cold country?, Happiness fascinates me, None of us are normal if we’re lucky, Four Reasons I Love It When “Love Wins”, Some Kind of Kindness, and When is it time for “More”?)

 

If you want to be happy move to a cold country?

beach vacationIt is hard to believe. Whatever happened to the idea that the ultimate in happiness was lounging on a tropical beach, umbrella drink in hand, while island music wafted by on a soft ocean breeze? Wait, that was the ideal vacation. What about the ideal life?

Well, the annual happiness report for 2016 is in and there is little that is sunny and warm about the locations that produce the most content people. The top thirteen, in order, are Denmark, Switzerland, Iceland, Norway, Finland, Canada, Netherlands, New Zealand, Australia, Sweden, Israel, and the U.S.

winter-vacationsDon’t believe it? Then let’s ask exactly how this happiness thing is being measured.

This is the fourth such report generated by Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) and the Earth Institute at Columbia University. The results are not obtained by just asking people if they are happy. Rather, they come from asking people in 156 countries to evaluate various parts of their lives on a scale from 0 to 10. Lots of variables are examined, but six attributes account for most of the variation among countries. I would sum these up as wealth, health, love, freedom, fairness and kindness. And yes, I could see how those all would contribute to happiness.

(Note that the more precise, but less succinct people who generate the report refer to these as real GDP per capita, healthy life expectancy, having someone to count on, perceived freedom to make life choices, freedom from corruption, and generosity as measured by donations.)

What countries currently have the least happy populations? Starting with the unhappiest, they are Burundi, Syria, Togo, Afghanistan, Benin, Rwanda, Guinea, Liberia, Tanzania, Madagascar, Yemen, Uganda, and Burkina Faso. Yes, there are a lot of warm, sunny places in here. More to the point, there are places torn apart by war, struggling with disease, and centers of extreme poverty, so clearly this isn’t really about climate.

Other happy countries include Costa Rica (#14) Mexico (#21) and Panama (#25).  Plenty of wonderful beaches in all three places. Meanwhile cold weather hardly guarantees happiness, with Bulgaria coming in at #129, the Ukraine at #123 and #Mongolia at 101.

raising ecstacy 1It is often said that happiness is an inside job, and to some extent that is true. We all know people who can be miserable anywhere, under any circumstances. But on the whole, in aggregate, we humans do respond to our environment. If we are materially comfortable, in good health, surrounded by those we care about and by others we perceive as fair and kind, and if we are free to life our lives as we want, then well, guess what. We are more likely to be happy.

Hot or cold, in sunshine or in snow, those places that are wise enough to make it a priority to foster such an such an environment for all are going to be the best places to live.

(For more posts on the subject of what makes us happy see Happiness fascinates me, None of us are normal if we’re lucky, Four Reasons I Love It When “Love Wins”, Some Kind of Kindness, The fairest of them all?, and When is it time for “More”?)

a close game

slipperAfter speculating about the joys of a tied game on my x0 blog here and the beauty of equilibrium points in nature on my z2 blog here, it seemed incomplete not to praise the virtues of a close game as well. No matter what the nature of the contest, most spectators consistently cheer on the Cinderella team or the surprisingly adept child, old person,  or new comer.  We like a close contest.  We appreciate a surprise. And we generally tire of the team that wins over and over.

sportsBut what if that repeat winner is just that good? What if a combination of hard work, skill and class accompany win after win? Then, the winner becomes an all time great,  and the singer/actor/dancer/musician/athlete/survivor/contestant/team is likely to garner both respect and fans as she, he or they continue to succeed.

And what if the repeat winner turns instead to taking short-cuts while bending rules, to discouraging the competition, to behaving with a sense of entitlement and with attempts to jury-rig the system in their favor? What if they campaign for rules that will benefit those with past success at the expense of newcomers? Odds are that most will be happy to see her, him or them loose.

stadiumIn the book y1, Toby bases his organization and his life’s work on the idea of fair competition. He wants to see every human have an equal chance to succeed. He doesn’t want to see the game of life always end in tie and he knows it won’t anyway.  But he believes that if we have a more or less level playing field, then we all will thrive. A lot more Cinderella teams should win, and there should be many more close games.