“Do What You Love” Is A LIE

Wow. Two blogs cross my path on the same day, both wise and both on the same subject. I loved “Do “what you love” long enough, and you’ll realize that the long and impossible journey towards home is, in fact, your home.” I saw both of these posts after their authors responded to my post https://ctothepowerofthree.org/2018/06/28/our-own-kind-of-porn/. You may want to check it out too.

Cristian Mihai

Do what you love. Love what you do.

Odds are you tried something in your life. A passion. A hobby. Something that got you excited, made you feel alive, like a fire burning inside your chest. It felt amazing doing it. And you did it, and did it, and kept at it, but in time it became more and more difficult to stay with it long enough to achieve true success.

Let’s face it: if you’re not in love anymore with what you’re doing, it feels like an uphill struggle. That’s OK if you’re a hobbyist or a dabbler, but if you want a career, if you want to live your life at the highest level possible, then all this might make you want to stop and try something else…

You want to quit because you weren’t expecting that doing what you loved would be so damn frustrating at times…

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Posted in joy.

5 Things You’ll Hate When You’re A Novelist

I’ve written before about how pursuing your dreams comes at a cost. Writing novels has changed me as a person, and not all of those changes have been for the good. I enjoyed this insightful post, and have to say I agree with all five of these. We are unhealthy introverts with messy houses waiting for that next writing high.

Frank Frisson

Introduction:

Being a novelist is far from what I thought it’d be like as a child. Others can argue, but I believe that there are way more things to hate about being a novelist than love. In this blog post you’ll find five such things. If you still want to be a novelist after this post, then welcome to the guild: because you already are one!

1. Not Experiencing the Writer’s High:

Yes, writing novels, or the art thereof, can be as addictive as any alcohol beverage, illegal drug, or cigarette. How? Well, the first time you manage to write something truly beautiful, you might notice that you are experiencing something similar to euphoria. Yep, you can get a kind of high from “writing something beautiful”, and I don’t mean a single high from having written an entire novel. I’m talking about that single beautiful chapter, page, paragraph, and even…

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Posted in joy.

Be Yourself? Which self?

“Just be yourself.” I’ve been given that suggestion hundreds of times, and it was particularly unwelcome coming from my waitress who I suspected had indulged in a few too many free shots at the bar.

In a way, it was my own fault. I’d broken one of my cardinal rules and shared a piece of personal information with this complete stranger. Once she knew I was apprehensive about meeting my fellow diners, she proceeded to offer a steady stream of unwanted advice until they arrived. This morning I’m still miffed that my oblivious husband tipped her 20%.

But bad restaurant experiences aside, that is a horrible piece of advice. Pretty much anything you do or say is yourself. Some sides of you are more likeable, or more fully developed, or more integrated into the whole you, but if it is coming out of your mouth without an intent to lie, it is you.

The problem is that we are all complex creatures. I have a squeamish side that gets nauseous at little things. I also have a this-is-an-emergency side that steps in and deals with the grossest of injuries if need be. I’m not faking either one. I’m not a simple person, and neither are you.

So when people tell me to be myself, my answer is “which self?” I’ve got at least dozen different genuine responses in my head to anything you have to say. Some may lead to a budding friendship, others to hostility. Over time you might get to know most of those sides of me, but which one do I let you see first?

This dilemma of defining the real me has recently spilled over into my writing, or more accurately into the marketing of my books. I love my book titles and my book covers. They are the real me. However, I’ve been told by those I respect that neither titles nor covers are helping me sell books.

After quite a bit of reflection, I’ve decided that being effective is also the real me. I’m practical and I like to achieve my goals. My goal is to find more readers. So, the real me is renaming my books and has sought out a professional to provide covers that will be a lot more like the one shown here. (It is for someone elses book about an appearance changer.)

What will those new names be? I’m having a lot of fun deciding on them. What will the new covers really look like? I can’t wait to find out. I’ll be sharing some of both here over the next few months, and if all goes according to plan a new crime novel about a gay genius who can change his appearance will be released in early January 2019.

The real me can’t wait.